Ravioli with Spicy Browned Butter and Sage Sauce

Costco’s sampling program is brilliant. Meet the 10 pounds of tilapia in my freezer, the giant box of frozen “pizza bites” and a 3-pound bag of spinach and ricotta ravioli that everybody in our house considers the D-list dinner.

This post is about how to make the best out of frozen ravioli. I’ve boiled it and then topped it with cheese, dredged it in bread crumbs and fried it, and now I’ve topped it with a spicy sage brown-butter sauce. This sauce is nutty and warm and a great twist for ravioli, tortilini and gnocci.

Sage is usually too strong for my taste, but the plant growing in our garden somehow isn’t as potent as that you buy in the store – even though the leaves are twice as big. Grant has also declared that he “loves” sage, so I always know a recipe will be a winner if I mention that sage was involved.

I adjusted this for two people and majorly reduced the salt – Giada’s original recipe must have fed a crowd because I found 1 1/2 tsp salt to be almost dish-ruining.

Ravioli with Spicy Browned Butter and Sage Sauce

Ingredients (serves 2):

  • 16-18 large ravioli
  • 1/4 c. unsalted butter
  • 2 T chopped fresh sage
  • 1/2 tsp paprika
  • 3/4 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • Parm-Reg cheese, or Romano

In large pot, boil ravioli in salted water until they float to the top – 5-7 min.

Meanwhile, melt butter in small saucepan and add sage, paprika and pepper flakes. Simmer until butter starts to turn brown – 2-3 min. Remove from heat and stir in salt.

To serve, drain ravioli and divide onto plates. Drizzle with browned butter sauce and top with extra fresh sage, if you have it, and shredded cheese.

There’s something really cool going on with the heat of the paprika and red pepper mixed with the sweetness of the butter and piney sage flavor moving through.

Tastes good with a cool glass of wine or a frosty beer, I must say.

Enjoy, friends! xoxo

6 responses to “Ravioli with Spicy Browned Butter and Sage Sauce

  1. Going home to make this right now! YUM!

  2. I’m curious what sort of paprika you’re using. I bought some La Dalia from a Spanish import site, and it’s really strong! Seems like a different beast. Any thoughts?

  3. Sounds like the commenter above got some smoked Spanish paprika, which would probably overpower this dish. Great in soups, stews, and chilis, though!

  4. Yes, Spanish paprika has quite a punch! Wonderful in chilis – here, it might compete too much with the earthy sage and sweetness of the butter. What you really want is just a little heat on the back of your tongue.

  5. Oh my that looks delicious.

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